Product Guidelines

 
 

Acceptable & Unacceptable Food Ingredients Brochure

 
 

Products We Choose to Carry  (revised 2019)

Product Philosophy

Our product selections reflect our mission and values, translating our ideals into action. To serve our community, we endeavor to be a full-service grocery store with the wide range of products our customers seek, including a broad selection of whole, staple foods at reasonable prices. In particular, our choices aspire to promote quality products, commitment to community, concern for the environment, fair treatment of workers, and support for the cooperative movement.

Product Guidelines

·     Quality Products: We favor whole foods with minimal processing; certified organically grown; verified non-GMO; and without ingredients on our unacceptable ingredients list.

·     Commitment to Community: We give preference to products grown or produced by small scale enterprises and to those grown or produced locally or regionally.

·     Concern for the Environment: We favor products with the least environmental impact.

·     Fair Treatment of Workers: We give preference to goods produced by workers who are fairly treated and fairly paid.

·     Support for the Co-op Movement: We give preference to products made and/or distributed by co-ops.


Animal Welfare Policy

The Food Co-op actively looks for products that are produced or raised in a manner that supports sustainable animal production and a healthy environment.

In departments where animal or meat products are sold, The Food Co-op selects products that:

o   Are raised or produced under humane methods or conditions,

o   Are organically fed, or locally raised,

o   Have not been fed antibiotics or hormones

o   That have been certified by third-party inspection.

We will not knowingly buy products from manufacturers who engage in animal testing or the egg production process known as forced molting.

We take several factors into consideration when purchasing animal products, including distance, transport time, processes taken and if suppliers have certifications.

rBGH- Free Policy:

Recombinant bovine growth hormone (rBGH) is a synthetic growth hormone that is used by some of the dairy industry to artificially increase milk production. The Food Co-op offers a wide selection of dairy products, including all of our fluid milk selections, none of which contain this synthetic chemical.

The Food Co-op Seafood Sustainability Policy

Adopted 2016

All of our fresh, frozen, and canned seafood meet the following guidelines.  

Or

  • Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certified. See msc.org. (MSC is also recommended by Seafood Watch.)

  • For those species not covered by Seafood Watch or MSC—for example, some sardines and anchovies—we support small community fisheries.

We may stock some farmed shellfish—for example, oysters and mussels—that Seafood Watch lists as best choice or good alternative

Seafood Watch quick reference guides are available at the canned fish and the fresh meat case.  

We continue to monitor certifications and origins, incorporating this information into our annual review of this policy.  

How The Food Co-op Aligns Our Products with Our Mission

The world of food has grown extremely complex. People have a variety of needs that lead them to look for products that include or exclude certain ingredients, and there are a plethora of labels (fair trade is especially confusing) and categories (just shelf stable milk has huge variety—soy, rice, oat, hemp, organic, non-GMO, etc.). Many new companies are emerging to fulfill the varied desires and needs of consumers. Companies change their ingredients or their label without notice. Small companies get bought by larger corporations.

It’s a complicated puzzle, and The Food Co-op has a variety of approaches to untangle this knot in order to serve the needs of all our members and shoppers while keeping our shelves stocked with products aligned with our values.

Buying

Guidelines

Our products are chosen by department managers and staff buyers who are dedicated to the mission of the Co-op. They look for products that help us fulfill the goals in our strategic plan*, and the choices are filtered through our product guidelines, such as Products We Choose to Carry, our seafood guidelines, and TAUFIL—The Acceptable and Unacceptable Food Ingredient List. They are always looking for organic, local or regional, non-GMO, fair-trade, and/or cooperatively made products.

Research

The Food Co-op’s Product Research Committee (PRC), comprised of staff members, members at large, and board members, researches questions about products raised by staff, producers, and members. When someone has a concern or a question, be it a committee member who read an article on an additive or an eagle-eyed staff member who notices that a label has changed, the PRC will try to get to the bottom of it. Then they pass the information on to the managers and buyers. PRC also writes informational articles for The Commons and has a binder at the front of the store. 

Advocacy

Buyer contacts

We are a relatively small store and do not wield much power through the amount of product we buy, but we can still influence our suppliers. For instance, our produce manager works continually with our suppliers and producers to get more environmentally friendly packaging. As you might expect, it is an uphill battle for a variety of reasons, but by letting suppliers and producers know what our customers want and expect, we gradually create change.

Endorsements

We also can endorse initiatives, such as label transparency laws or plastic bag bans.

National Cooperative Grocers

The NCG, which is a cooperative of cooperative grocery stores, allows us to band together with other co-ops for better prices, but also to advocate for better practices. Most recently, the NCG asked the Willamette Valley Pie Company to change the palm oil in their pies sold to NCG members to Palm Done Right palm oil.  After looking at the issue, the company made the choice to make all of their pies with Palm Done Right palm oil, not just those they sell to NCG members.

Not Buying

Choosing not to purchase

Our managers are committed to our mission and values, and if necessary, they will choose to temporarily or permanently stop buying a product if an issue arises. They do not need to wait for a formal boycott from the board; they are empowered to make their own, well-thought out decisions based on their knowledge, their extensive contacts, information from the PRC, etc.

Boycotts

Boycotts are political statements that are very useful in certain situations. We join boycotts with care and consideration, following our Civic Engagement and Action Policy (C9) and our boycott procedure. We do not boycott ingredients (that falls under our product guidelines and TAUFIL), countries, or people.

Companies Purchased by Corporations Who Do Not Meet Our Standards

Our overarching goals at The Food Co-op are to offer good food and support our community. Speaking a little grandly, we want to make the world a better place. We believe this is a gradual process that often moves in fits and starts and we believe the greatest success will come from positive actions rather than the punitive ones.

We know many corporations have focused on profit at the expense of the environment and human rights and we know some corporations are steadily buying up the small organic companies on which we rely for our products. As a cooperative, democratic organization, we believe that there can be positive change in the world, even if it is incremental and even from corporations. We don’t expect the corporations to become cooperative or suddenly good, but we do think they can become better and we believe even small improvements could make a huge difference in our world. And if good products reach more people, that is also progress. So rather than simply dropping the products, we have chosen to monitor companies thus acquired to make sure they stay true to our standards.

When an independent company is bought by a large corporation, the PRC sends a letter asking the following questions:

1) Will your product be changed? If so how?

2) Will your employment and environmental practices be changed? If so, how?

3) What influenced your decision to be purchased by Nestlé/General Mills/Campbell’s/Coca Cola?

4) What input do you expect to have with that corporation to influence positive changes in their products and employment and environmental practices?

This letter both gives us information and lets the company know that we are paying attention. The PRC then monitors the company to ensure it continues to fulfill our standards.

Note: The Food Co-op carries a few products we might not normally carry—such as Cheerios—in order to qualify for WIC (Women, Infants, and Children), which helps families get food.


Suggest a Product

Name *
Name